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									  SUPPS-P IMPULSE BEHAVIOR SCALE (short UPPS-P)
SCRIPT INFO

Script Author: Katja Borchert, Ph.D. (katjab@millisecond.com) for Millisecond Software, LLC
Date: 01-28-2013
last updated: 07-06-2016 by K.Borchert (katjab@millisecond.com) for Millisecond Software LLC

Copyright © 07-06-2016 Millisecond Software


BACKGROUND INFO

											*Purpose*
This script implements the SUPPS-P impulsive behavior scale as discussed in:

Cyders, MA, Littlefield, AK, Coffey, S, Karyadi, KA (2014).
Examination of a short English version of the UPPS-P Impulsive
Behavior Scale. Addictive Behaviors 39 (2014) 1372–1376.

The original UPPS/UPPS-P scale was published by:

Whiteside, S. P., & Lynam, D. R. (2001). The Five Factor Model and impulsivity: using a structural 
model of personality to understand impulsivity. Personality and Individual Differences, 30(4), 669-689

and made availabe at: http://www1.psych.purdue.edu/~dlynam/uppspage.htm


											  *Task*
20 4-point Likert Questions regarding impulsive behavior


DATA FILE INFORMATION: 
The default data stored in the data files are:

(1) Raw data file: 'SUPPS.iqdat'

date, time, group, subject:		date and time script was run with the current group/subjectnumber 
build:							the Inquisit build 

q*_response:					response given (in assigned values; responses DO reflect reversed scoring) 
q*_latency:						how much time (in ms) the participant spent on the surveypage with this particular question (the last time this particular surveypage was visited)

Items are initially scored on a scale from 1(strongly agree) to 4 (strongly disagree)
Items are then automatically reversed-scored where appropriate to reflect that higher values indicate more impulsive behavior

(2) Summary data file: 'SUPPS_P_summary*.iqdat' (a separate file for each participant)

script.startdate:				date script was run
script.starttime:				time script was started
script.subjectid:				subject id number
script.groupid:					group id number
script.elapsedtime:				time it took to run script (in ms)
computer.platform:				the platform the script was run on
/completed:						0 = script was not completed (prematurely aborted); 1 = script was completed (all conditions run)
Summarydata for each participant: file saves the scores for the subscales and totalscore (responses are reversed scored if appropriate)
Min (4) - Max (16) for each Subscale
Min (20) - Max (80) for totalscore => higher values indicate more impulsive behavior

SURVEY SET-UP
5 facets:
1) Negative Urgency: 6(R), 8(R), 13(R), 15(R)
"measures an individual’s tendency to act “impulsively” under conditions of negative affect" *

2) (lack of) Premeditation: 2, 5, 12, 19
"assesses an individual’s tendency to act without consideration of the potential consequences of the behavior" *

3) (lack of) Perseverance: 1, 4, 7, 11
"assesses an individual’s tendency to give up in the face of boredom, fatigue, or frustration." *

4) Sensation Seeking: 9(R), 14(R), 16(R), 18(R)
"refers to an individual’s interest in and tendency to pursue activities that are exciting and novel" *

5) Positive Urgency: 3(R), 10(R), 17(R), 20(R)
"Positive Urgency, assesses an individual’s tendency to give in to impulses under conditions of high positive affect." *

(R) = reversed scoring

Items are initially scored on a scale from 1(strongly agree) to 4 (strongly disagree)
Items are then automatically reversed-scored where appropriate to reflect that higher values indicate more impulsive behavior


Note: Cyders et al (2014, table1) report to reverse score items that would actually result in lower scores for more impulsive behavior,
despite the fact they also write that "Items with an (R) are reverse coded, so that higher values indicate more impulsive behavior".

Example q1: "I generally like to see things through to the end.* (R)"
"On a four point scale from 1 (strongly agree) to 4 (strongly disagree)", if one strongly agrees with this statement, 
the initial score of '1' would end up being coded as '4' as it's a R item; 
yet agreeing to this statement is the opposite of impulsive behavior and should result in a low score not a high one.

We assume that the items were actually originally coded as (strongly agree = 4 to strongly disagree = 1) by Cyders et al (2014) before
reverse coding them.


EDITABLE CODE:
check below for (relatively) easily editable parameters, stimuli, instructions etc. 
Keep in mind that you can use this script as a template and therefore always "mess" with the entire code to further customize your experiment.

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